November Is Lung Cancer Awareness Month

Thank you AstraZeneca for sponsoring this post. November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month. Now more than ever, there is reason for hope. Please visit LIVE W.E.L.L. and LVNG With Lung Cancer for more information.

November Is Lung Cancer Awareness Month

Did you know that November is Lung Cancer Awareness month? In the United States, lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, accounting for approximately 154,000 deaths each year and about one-quarter of all cancer deaths – more than breast, prostate and colorectal cancers combined. That’s an awfully sobering fact that I bet a lot of you did not already know. Today, I will share with you some more facts about lung cancer and helpful tips and information that you can use if you or someone you love has been diagnosed with this disease.

November Is Lung Cancer Awareness Month

In 2018, an estimated 234,000 people will be diagnosed with lung cancer – that is three and a half times the number of seats in a typical professional football stadium.

That is a horrifying statistic. What’s worse is that there are many types of lung cancer, each requiring different types of treatments. There are medicines that have been proven to benefit patients with specific types of lung cancer, so if diagnosed, it is critical to understand the details of your diagnosis and talk to your medical team about what treatments are approved to treat your specific type of disease.

November Is Lung Cancer Awareness Month

Jay’s dad [center] passed away from lung cancer in 2013.

Lung cancer stage is determined by tumor size and whether it has spread to nearby areas, lymph nodes, or other organs. Some of these stages have unique names, which can sometimes make understanding the types of lung cancer confusing.

About 1 out of every 4 people diagnosed with NSCLC – more than 43,000 cases each year in the US – are diagnosed with Stage 3. And most people who are diagnosed with Stage 3 NSCLC have tumors that are determined to be “unresectable,” meaning they cannot be removed surgically.

There are 4 main stages of NSCLC, with Stage 3 having better long-term survival rates than Stage 4. With the advancement of treatment options, it is critical for patients not to give up – to be aware of their options and talk to their doctor about what treatments may be appropriate for them.

The bottom line is that patients should be their own advocates: get tested for the right treatment options, wait for the results and start on the best option first.

November Is Lung Cancer Awareness Month

This is Jay’s sister, Misty. Their dad, Jerry, passed away from lung cancer in 2013.

I remember watching my grandfather suffer from breathing issues. Though he did not have lung cancer [he had emphysema] I could still relate to those who have watched their loved ones suffer with lung cancer. While we were together, Jay’s dad developed lung cancer. He passed away in 2013 and the family was devastated.

November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month. If you or anyone you love has been diagnosed with lung cancer, it is critical that they become their own advocate. Educate yourself and those close to you so you can more fully understand the diagnosis. Talk to your medical team about what treatment options are right for you. Now more than ever, there is reason for hope. Please visit LIVE W.E.L.L. and LVNG With Lung Cancer for more information.

I was selected for this opportunity as a member of CLEVER and the content and opinions expressed here are all my own.

About Dawn McAlexander

Dawn is a full time travel and lifestyle blogger. Besides Cheap Is The New Classy, she also owns and writes for EatPlayRock.com, an entertainment site. Her interests include traveling, home decor, DIY projects, organizing her home and enjoying a nice cup of coffee {or two}. She currently resides in North Carolina with her dog, Daisy.